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Avocado Toast

18 Apr

avocado toastWhat you will  need:

  • 1 ripe avocado
  • REALLY good bread – dense, seedy – I like Cob’s Cape Seed Loaf. Believe me, the bread makes the difference.
  • extra virgin olive oil that’s just for eating – I like Bom Dia
  • truffle oil (optional)
  • fresh lemon juice (for sprinkling)
  • sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • cayenne pepper
  1. Toast bread till crispy
  2. Drizzle extra virgin olive oil and truffle oil (optional, to taste) – can go on bread or on avocado. Personal preference.
  3. Put as much avocado on your toast as you want – some recipes call to mash like guacamole but I prefer mash some, leave some chunks. It’s a personal preference.
  4. Sprinkle lemon juice on avocado.
  5. Season with sea salt (crunchy), freshly ground pepper and a healthy sprinkle of cayenne pepper.
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Addicted to Juice

23 Jan

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I admit, I’m addicted to juice. Not orange juice, not grapefruit juice, not any that comes out of a carton (Happy Planet Extreme Green is the exception) but fresh healthy juice that’s more veggie than fruit (3:1). I had my first taste, loved it, but refuse to pay $5-7 for a 8-10oz serving so I decided to make my own. It’s so cheap when you buy fresh produce and it comes out to $2 a serving. I invested in the “Rolls Royce” of juicers, the Breville Juice Fountain Elite which produces 30% more juice – truth, as the pulp comes out almost dry, can juice whole fruits and veggies with it’s 1000watt motor so you don’t have to cut them up, and clean up is 3 minutes.

Typically the guidelines for making green juice is 60% dark green leafy vegetables and 40% other vegetables/fruits.  You can try variations of any of the green recipes until you find one that suits your needs and tastes.  For a juice cleanse you’ll drink approximately 4 x 16-20 ounce drinks per day.  If  you are making a whole day’s worth of juice at one time, keep the extra juice in a tightly sealed container in the fridge.

Juice is the first thing that goes into my tummy in the morning (no more coffee!) and the last thing I crave before going to bed. Trust me, you’ll feel a lot better, healthier and get addicted too!

Red Juice (makes 16-18oz or 2 glasses)

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  • 1 beet
  • 1 med carrot
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 2 stalks kale (more or less)
  • 2-3 small gala apples
  • 1/4 to 1/2 lime
  • 1″ ginger (optional – I’ll put it in if I need a spicy immune booster)

Juice the beets and carrots first, then the rest of the fruits and veggies. If you save the beets for last and if you get it on your countertop, cutting board, or anything it will stain!!! So juice the beets, carrots and kale first, then the celery and apples so it will rinse the beet juice out of the juicer.

Optional to mix some cayenne (if you didn’t add the ginger and substitute lime for lemon) to kickstart your metabolism.

Green Juice

  • 1 cup tightly packed kale
  • 4 stalks celery
  • 1 1/2 pears, cut into large pieces
  • 1″ piece of fresh ginger
  • 1/2 lemon, zest and pith removed

Juice everything into a glass, being sure to alternate the kale with the other ingredients to help it get through the juicer easily (I follow each small bit of kale with a celery stalk).

Mean Green Juice (Original)

This is the official recipe used by Joe Cross and Phil Staples according to the Reboot Program as featured in the movie Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead.

  • 6 Kale Leaves
  • 1 Cucumber
  • 4 Celery Stalks
  • 2 Green Apples
  • 1/2 Lemon
  • 1 piece of ginger

Mean Green Juice #2

  • handful spinach
  • 3 stalks of kale
  • 2 golden delicious apples
  • small handful parsley
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 cucumber

Mean Green Juice #3

  • 2 stalks celery
  • 1/2 cucumber
  • 1/2 apple
  • 1/2 lemon
  • small piece ginger
  • 1/2 green chard leaf
  • bunch cilantro
  • 5 kale leaves
  • handful spinach

Mean Green Juice #4

  • 1/2 pear
  • 1/2 green apple
  • handful spinach
  • handful parsley
  • 2 celery stalks
  • 1/2 cucumber
  • small piece ginger
  • slice of papaya

NOTES FOR MAKING JUICE

  • peel or slice off lemon rind leaving some of the white pith *** I like to use Meyer Lemons for it’s thin rind so I don’t have to do this step***
  • to juice small leaves such as parsley and cilantro, roll them up into a ball to compact the leaves
  • wash all vegetables and fruits before making juice
  • buy organic if possible

 

Homestyle Craving: 小米粥 Millet Congee

20 Dec

20121021_172600When I went back to Taiwan, out of the very many dishes I craved, I really wanted something that I dreaded to eat as a child. It was tasteless but nutty and had a weird texture – that’s probably because my mom wouldn’t let me put brown sugar in it. The secret to 小米粥 is to toast the millet before you make it into congee. Simple, but I couldn’t figure it out till I asked my grandma. If you have a chance to go to Taipei, hit up the restaurant on the corner across from the parking lot at the Shida Night Market (vague, I know) – really good stuff.

Note that if you apply heat to the millet beforehand, it will be more separate in the porridge as the starch will have hardened. Thus it’s recommended to toast QUICKLY 1/3 to 1/2 for flavour, then rinse with the rest and then cooked.

UPDATE: Mine wasn’t turning out in the same consistency as what I ate in Taiwan. Mom said to add half a cup (rice cup) or less of uncooked rice. Wash and cook with the millet.

UPDATE 2: For creaminess – boil water w/bit of salt then add millet. Cook like you would with oatmeal. Add almond milk for creaminess & boil down. Add raw sugar to taste. 

NOTE: if you need to add more water if the consistency is too thick, ADD BOILING WATER, not cold water!!!

小米粥 Millet Porridge (Xiao Mi Zhou)

Ingredients:

Serves: 3-4
Yield: 3 cups
  • 1 3/4 cups water
  • 2 cups boiling water as reserve
  • 1/2 cup dry millet
  • 1/2 chinese cup of uncooked rice (more like 2-3 tablespoons)

Directions:

  1. Toast 1/3 or 1/2 of the millet in bottom of pan or in skillet over medium-high heat for 3-5 minutes, until some aroma begins to waft.
  2. In the meantime, bring water to a boil. How much you use depends on how thick you want your porridge.
  3. Add the rest of the millet.
  4. Add millet to boiling water and boil over medium-high to low heat for 25 – 30 minutes, until done. It will not absorb all the water, but some color and starch will be released to let you know as cooking finishes.
  5. If desired, add a few tablespoons of milk for creaminess.
  6. Eat warm, adding  demerara sugar or honey to taste.

If you like chinese soups, check out The Chinese Soup Lady – for all the pregnancy soups, confinement soups etc.

What’s been haunting me: Brazil Sao Judas Tadeu Coffee

30 Jul

Brazil Sao Judas Tadeu

May 2012 – July 2012

49th Parallel notes: Sweet, soft – dried apricot, chocolate & toasted almond.

Elysian Coffee notes: well balanced and mildly acidic with a medium, buttery mouth-feel.  Aromas of: almond, marzipan and vanilla, with: pistachio, apricot and milk chocolate. You want to brew this on Clover there.

My notes: Sweet, smooth, extremely well balanced. Buttery, caramel, chocolate, bit of almond, some fig. A bit of cream brings out the best of it. Mindblowingly amazing, yet hauntingly delicious. Liquid heaven.

 

The Ultimate Chocolate Ice Cream for the Most Discerning Chocoholic (w/Brandied Cherries)

20 Jun

I’m not a huge Chocoholic, but when I want to eat chocolate it’d better be damn good. I like my ice cream rich in flavour, all natural and delicious. I love any recipe by the ice cream guru himself, David Leibovitz, and this will surely win over any discerning Chocoholic or will convert non-believers. Not too sugary sweet, very rich… A crowd pleaser.

As for the brandied cherries, first time I had them was at the now closed The Corner Suite Bistro De Luxe. I used the recipe below, and kept them in the fridge to marinate for a year. I was initially going to chop them up, but was afraid that the syrup would change the flavour of the ice cream. However, if you freeze the cherries, chop them up and add them that would probably work, but then again alcohol doesn’t freeze well.

I’m trying a new method here, not just photos, but tips and tricks before the actual recipe.

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I bought a chunk of Callebaut bittersweet chocolate, mostly because most chocolate recipes require bittersweet and not semisweet and so the chocolate can be used for other purposes. 5oz of chocolate doesn’t seem like much (0.142kg) but that’s all you need. I tried to be cool by shaving chocolate which took a lot of effort, so take a shortcut by using chocolate chips or bars. Then again, it probably won’t melt as fast.

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When cooking the egg mixture, be sure to work fast and be vigilant or else you’ll end up with scrambled eggs. There will always be a little, hence the straining, but it only takes a few seconds for the whole thing to turn into a wet egg mess. When pouring the milk into the egg yolk, whisk fast and furious. When cooking the egg mixture, watch it carefully – once it coats the back of the wooden spoon, remove it from heat, and immediately strain into the chocolate, because the eggs will keep cooking.

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I tend to like to adjust the flavour as it freezes – if it’s too bitter, add tablespoons of condensed milk till it’s just right. If it’s not creamy enough, I like to add coffee cream The ice cream is so rich and dense, once it hardens it’s like a fudgesicle. For frozen treats, pour and freeze in a popsicle mold. Add almonds or chunks of skor bars to up it, or keep it pure.

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Chocolate Ice Cream
from David Lebovitz’s The Perfect Scoop

2 cups heavy cream
3 tablespoons unsweetened Dutch-process cocoa powder
5 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
1 cup whole milk
¾ cup granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
5 large egg yolks
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
Coffee cream, condensed milk

Warm 1 cup of the cream with the cocoa powder in a medium saucepan, whisking to thoroughly blend the cocoa. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer at a very low boil for 30 seconds, whisking constantly. Remove from the heat and add the chopped chocolate, stirring until smooth. Then stir in the remaining 1 cup cream. Pour the mixture into a large bowl, scraping the saucepan as thoroughly as possible, and set a mesh strainer on top of the bowl.

Warm the milk, sugar, and salt in the same saucepan. In a separate medium bowl, whisk together the egg yolk. Slowly pour the warm milk into the egg yolks, whisking constantly, then scrape the warmed egg yolks back into the saucepan.

Stir the mixture constantly over the medium heat with a heatproof spatula, scraping the bottom as you stir, until the mixture thickens and coats the spatula (170°F on an instant-read thermometer). Pour the custard through the strainer and stir it into the chocolate mixture until smooth, then stir in the vanilla. Stir until cool over an ice bath.

Chill the mixture thoroughly in the refrigerator, then freeze it in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. (If the cold mixture is too thick to pour into your machine, whisk it vigorously to thin it out.)

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A cherry pitter from Ming Wo is your best friend – makes the pitting fast, easy and mess free. Always boil the jar and lid you’re going to use.

Lu’s Brandied Cherries
Homemade brandied cherries are a simple and delicious way to dress up your cocktails.

1 lb. sweet cherries, pitted
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup water
2 tsp. lemon juice, fresh-squeezed
1 stick cinnamon
Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 cup brandy
Tools: cherry pitter, saucepan, ladle, jars with lids

Wash and pit the cherries. In a saucepan, combine all ingredients except the cherries and brandy and bring to a rolling boil. When the liquid begins to boil, reduce the heat to medium. Add the cherries and simmer for 5–7 minutes. Remove from heat, add the brandy and let cool. Transfer the cherries into clean jars and refrigerate, uncovered until cherries are cool to touch. Cover tightly and refrigerate for up to two weeks.

I <3 Niçoise

26 May

The Nicoise Salad is a fave of mine – I can eat it for days on end because not only is it delicious, filling without the guilt and colourful, but it adheres to the Mediterranean diet that is low-fat (or of healthy fat), a source of high quality, lean protein, and even supplies Omega-3 fatty acids. A bit of background here, it’s a specialty of the Côte d’Azur and named for the city of Nice.

Best place in Vancouver (I welcome your suggestions) and where I got hooked on it: Les Faux Bourgeois

This is my staple recipe, but feel free to sub tuna in olive oil with seared Ahi, or grilled chicken,  or cherry tomatoes for the larger variety. Haricot verts can be found in the frozen section at the Gourmet Warehouse and maybe Whole Foods.  There’s also a pasta version, if you want to serve it potluck style.

Bon Appétit!

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Perfect Summer Delights: Rhubarb Lavender Crumble

25 Jun

Saw a bunch of juicy, thick and crunchy rhubarb at the grocer the other day, and it reminded me of this delicious recipe that’s perfect for summer, family gathering, BBQs, potlucks, or just to share for 2. Love the tarty rhubarb, the sweet fragrant lavender aftertaste, and the crunchy crumble. Pair with vanilla,  strawberry  or homemade honey ice cream (recipe below).

NOTE: The more sugar the better! You can’t say that about most recipes, but this one is fool proof. Use white granulated with some packed brown or golden. You can’t go wrong because it needs to counter the tartness of the rhubarb.

***

Rhubarb Lavender Crumble

9×13 pan of rhubarb crumble – serves 4-8

2 pounds fresh rhubarb, leaves removed and discarded
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup honey
Pinch salt
1/2 teaspoon dried lavender buds
1 batch of Basic Oat Crumble Topping for Fruit – Softer Version (below)
3/4 cup sliced and toasted almonds
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar

  1. Heat the oven to 375°F. Prepare a 9×13 pan by greasing lightly with butter or with oil spray. Cut the rhubarb stalks into small pieces – about the size of your knuckle. They should be evenly sized. Toss with the sugar, honey, and salt. Rub the lavender between your hands, crushing it into the rhubarb. Stir everything and spread evenly in the baking pan.
  2. Spread the crumble topping over the rhubarb. Melt the butter, toasted almonds, and brown sugar together in the microwave or in a small saucepan, and dot over the crumble topping.
  3. Bake at 375°F for 40-45 minutes, or until the topping is lightly browned. Let cool for at least 15 minutes, then serve with whipped cream or strawberry ice cream.

***

Basic Oat Crumble Topping for Fruit – Softer Version

tops a 9×13 pan

1 1/2 cup rolled oats
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
Spices – cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger
Pinch of salt
5 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
Nuts (optional)
Water or milk

Mix the dry ingredients. Stir in the melted butter. Add just enough water or milk so that the mix comes together in loose clumps – not too wet. Stir in the nuts, if using. Dot the fruit with the mixture evenly and bake at 375 for about 45 minutes.

***

Honey Ice Cream

4 large egg yolks
2/3 cup pure honey
1/8 teaspoon salt
3 cups half-and-half
Optional infusions, inclusions* (add-ins) or swirls (see “Four Ways To Customize,” below)

*Infusions are flavors that are infused into the milk or cream; then the flavoring element (cinnamon stick, ginger, etc.) is removed. Inclusions is the industry term for what many of us call “mix-ins.” Of course, “inclusions” simply means “other things that are included” in the ice cream—nuts, chocolate chips, pieces of whatever.

  1. Whisk together eggs, honey and salt in medium bowl; set aside. In a medium saucepan, bring half-and-half to a full simmer with any infusions. Remove from heat. If infusing, cover and let steep 2 hours; strain into another medium saucepan and bring to a simmer again.
  2. Slowly add 1 cup of the simmering cream mix to the egg-honey mixture while whisking (to avoid scrambling the eggs); then return the egg and cream mixture to the saucepan.
  3. Again bring to a simmer over medium-low heat, stirring constantly until the custard thickens enough to coat a spoon and the thermometer reads 170°F to 175°F, about 4 minutes (do not boil).
  4. Strain into a clean bowl and allow steam to escape before covering and chilling until cold (at least 3 hours and up to 1 day).
  5. Process custard in ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions; add soft add-in ingredients half way through freezing or chunky ingredients during the last 2 to 5 minutes.
  6. Transfer to a bowl or tub, add any desired swirls and serve, or cover and freeze until firm—at least 3 hours and up to 3 days.

Four Ways To Customize Honey Ice Cream

  1. Switch your dairy: Replace up to 1 cup of the half-and-half with heavy cream, plain yogurt, buttermilk or sour cream.
  2. Infusions: Infuse the cream base with 1 to 2 tablespoons of your favorite herbs (such as lavender or mint), spices (crushed sticks or cloves), botanicals (grated citrus rind or chopped ginger root), a split and scraped vanilla bean or a few saffron threads.
  3. Inclusions (Add-ins): Halfway through the churning process, add up to 1 cup of fruit orvegetable purée, soft cream cheese or blue cheese. Or, during the last 2 to 5 minutes, add 1/2 cup to 1 cup of juicy berries, chunks of ripe fruit, nuts, bits of pure honeycomb or chocolate pieces.
  4. Swirls: Immediately after churning and before serving (or packing in freezer tubs), swirl in whatever creamy, thick confection that tempts, such as caramel or chocolate sauce.

Yield: 1 Quart

How to make Taiwanese ZhongZi (or ZongZi) 粽子

16 Jun

Today is the 5th day of the 5th lunar month in Chinese calendar, aka The Dragon Boat Festival (Duanwu Festival 端午节 in Chinese). I hardly look at the lunar calendar but only know when it’s coming when T&T starts selling 粽子 (ZongZi or ZhongZi), lychee is in season or when Grandma starts making zhongi. I asked her to teach me how to make it this year, and she was glad to pass down the tradition to me. It’s actually quite easy, but the preparation process is complex and the wrapping needs to be practiced.

What this is great for, is getting friends and family together to make it and eat together – and that’s what it’s really about.

粽子 / ZhongZi / ZongZi Recipe

(courtesy of and featuring my Grandma)

Ingredients:

If you are comfortable with cooking and experimenting, discard all my measurements (as usual), but use it as a reference.

  • 1.3 lbs sticky rice
  • bamboo leaves as needed (and string)
  • 1/6lb peanuts (optional, as much as you like)
  • 0.65oz dried miniature shrimp
  • 0.65oz dried chinese mushrooms
  • 1/2lbs pork (fatty, belly, whatever… chunked)
  • fried shallots as needed
  • 2 tbsp light soy sauce (or more to taste)
  • 1 tsp rice wine (or to taste)
  • 1/2 tsp sugar (or brown sugar syrup. DO NOT use Taiwanese black sugar)
  • salt, white pepper, to taste
  • Optional: Salted duck egg, chestnuts, dried minced daikon radish.
  • Serve with: sweet chili sauce or sweet soy sauce.

Preparation:

  • Soak overnight: peanuts, dried chinese mushrooms, dried miniature shrimp
  • Wash bamboo leaves thoroughly and till pliable. Remove stems and leave in bowl with some water to keep moist but not soak.
  • Wash rice thoroughly and rinse 3-4 times. Add 3 tsp of salt and mix. Update: soak for at least half an hour if you are planning to use a pressure cooker, 3 hours to overnight if using a steamer
  • Peel cooked salted duck egg. Remove the white and the membrane around the yolk. Toss with a tbsp of rice wine for flavour.

Methods – meat filling:

  1. Heat oil in wok. Add pork chunks and stirfry till fragrant. Remove from heat.
  2. Add more oil to wok if necessary. Stirfry shrimp and fried shallots, then add mushrooms and stirfry till fragrant. Add peanuts and mix.
  3. Add meat, season with soy sauce, rice wine, sugar. Saute rapidly over high heat until boiling (add enough soy and rice wine so that there is some liquid). Reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes. ALWAYS TASTE and add more if necessary of any ingredient.

Methods – wrapping:

  1. Take 2 leaves, one larger than the other and opposite end to opposite end. Overlap, with the smaller leaf on the top, line the edge of the leaves up but with the smaller leaf a little higher. (You’ll need to watch the video to know what I mean).
  2. Fold and form a funnel shape, with the left end longer than the right.
  3. Place rice, filling, and more rice as in the video.
  4. Fold the bottom over, pinch the sides in and push the rice and filling upwards. Make sure it’s tight or else when it’s cooked the rice will turn into mush. Pinch the top and fold. Secure with cotton string.

Methods – cooking – 2 ways:

  1. Boiling in pressure cooker: Put dumplings into pressure cooker and cover with water. Cook until boiling and reduce heat to medium-high. Cook for 20 minutes. Remove and cool. But always test first to see amount of cooking time depending on heat source, pressure cooker etc.
  2. Steaming: Bring water in steamer to a boil, and steam over low heat for 1 hour or until done.

Serve with sweet chili sauce or sweet soy paste.

Since everyone’s at Cafe Medina right this moment…

5 Jun

It’s gorgeous today – sunny, cool and blue skies and fluffy clouds as far as the eye can see. What it really is, is perfect brunch weather. Before I even looked outside I knew what it was like, because pretty much every Vancouverite on my twitter feed was heading to Cafe Medina.

I’m not going to post a long review because it’d be redundant. Everyone raves about the waffles, muses over the food, gushes about the coffee and laments about the wait time.

My must eats/drinks:

    Lavender Latte – regular lattes will ever taste the same again. Delicate and fragrant, with 49th Parallel as the coffee of choice (Organic Epic Espresso). I’m off to conjure up some lavender syrup (simple syrup infused with lavender buds overnight. Touch of honey?)
    Waffles – it’s the Belgian waffles that everyone raves about. Toppings offered:
    Dark chocolate, Milk chocolate Lavender, White Chocolate Pistachio Rosewater, Fig Orange Marmalade, Raspberry Caramel, Mixed Berry Compote. If you want the liege waffles at home, head to Patisserie Lebeau where they make it fresh or sell frozen. Available in the frozen section at Meinhardt, Capers, Choices, Urban Fare, Whole Foods. I recreated the fig orange marmalade in a post a few years ago and will be posting a blueberry lavender and a blueberry/limoncello compote recipe soon.
    Le Chasseur – A savoury dish of 2 fried eggs, bison sausage, wild boar bacon, braised potato, watercress, roasted tomato, green peppercorn and grilled foccaccia. This was devoured so fast that I didn’t have a chance to take a photo. Perfect for sharing.
    UPDATE: Went there for my Lavender Latte fix this morning – another sign that Cafe Medina really cares about it’s food? Besides making their own waffles, they make their own syrup for their coffees. Check out all the vanilla beans in there! Good stuff!

Buttermilk Biscuits & Maple Butter

19 May

If you’re a foodie, wherever you travel you want to try something new, unique or local. So when I went to NYC last week, I wanted to try something that hasn’t really been developed in Vancouver – the BBQ.

I mean we have great seafood, Japanese food (hey, Tojo invented the california roll!), the best Chinese food outside of Asia, and world renowned chefs here, but no authentic BBQ houses. I don’t mean steakhouses like Morton’s or Gotham, but BBQ in the southern US sense. And no, the Keg and Red Lobster don’t count.

So my friend took me to Virgil’s BBQ (the “original New York City barbecue restaurant”) in the heart of Times Square and I pigged out on BBQ nachos (nachos topped w/pulled pork, jalapenos, cheese, bbq sauce etc.), sliced Texas beef brisket, pulled pork, collard greens… and if I had more room and time I would have had cheese grits, potato salad, ribs, bbq chicken, cornbread ….

But what really blew my mind, was the homely Buttermilk Biscuits and Maple Butter. Didn’t look like much, but it was  plump, buttery and savoury… and the maple butter? Foodie orgasm.

Southern Buttermilk Biscuits 

Serves 10

  1. Preheat your oven to 450°F.
  2. Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl, or in the bowl of a food processor.
  3. Cut the butter into chunks and cut into the flour until it resembles course meal.
  4. If using a food processor, just pulse a few times until this consistency is achieved.
  5. Add the buttermilk and mix JUST until combined.
  6. If it appears on the dry side, add a bit more buttermilk.
  7. Turn the dough out onto a floured board.
  8. Gently, gently PAT (do NOT roll with a rolling pin) the dough out until it’s about 1/2″ thick.
  9. Use a round cutter to cut into rounds.
  10. You can gently knead the scraps together and make a few more, but they will not be anywhere near as good as the first ones.
  11. Place the biscuits on a cookie sheet- if you like soft sides, put them touching each other.
  12. If you like”crusty” sides, put them about 1 inch apart- these will not rise as high as the biscuits put close together.
  13. Bake for about 10-12 minutes- the biscuits will be a beautiful light golden brown on top and bottom.
  14. Do not overbake.
  15. Note: The key to real biscuits is not in the ingredients, but in the handling of the dough.
  16. The dough must be handled as little as possible or you will have tough biscuits.
  17. I have found that a food processor produces superior biscuits, because the ingredients stay colder and there’s less chance of overmixing.
  18. You also must pat the dough out with your hands, lightly.
  19. Rolling with a rolling pin is a guaranteed way to overstimulate the gluten, resulting in a tougher biscuit.
  20. Note 2: You can make these biscuits, cut them, put them on cookie sheets and freeze them for up to a month.
  21. When you want fresh biscuits, simply place them frozen on the cookie sheet and bake at 450°F for about 20 minutes.

Hot & Spicy Maple Butter for Biscuits

 Serve on buttermilk biscuits alongside your favorite barbecue.

SERVES 8

  1. Mix together butter, maple syrup and hot pepper sauce in bowl until well blended.
  2. Serve on buttermilk biscuits.

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