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Why the only newspaper I will ever read…

10 May

is the New York Times, moreover, the MASSIVE Sunday Edition that will seriously take a whole Sunday to read. The other news media outlet I read to catch up on mundane local news is 24 Hours because it’s no fuss, compact, and free.

I love the New York Times, as well as New York Magazine. Not because it’s about New York (oh it’s so much more than that), but because it is SO well written, so intelligent and so interesting. If I could take 5 items with me to a deserted island, it would be moisturizer w/sunscreen, designer sunglasses, lipbalm w/spf, laptop w/internet connection and a subscription to the Sunday Edition.  Ok, so I kinda cheated by combining things.

So I ventured out early last Sunday to buy it. As of 10am, 2 places were sold out. When finally I got my grubby little hands on the 2.25″ thick paper, I was appalled to hand over $10.00 CDN. With a sigh I realized that I would have to treasure this moment because I will never buy this in print again, and vowed to read EVERY last word from ads to fine print.

As of today, I’m still reading it.

But it’s not about news. News is pretty much already old once it’s printed – it’s the opinions and the articles that don’t go stale. I’d buy it just for NYT Magazine and the Style mag- those are going on the coffee table.

Take this A-HA! moment I had while reading this interview with Charlaine Harris, author of True Blood:

Why do you think vampires are omnipresent in popular culture?
People are really interested in the concept of eternal youth in this plastic-surgery culture. Vampires never die.

A-HA!

Now that was worth my $10.

And I haven’t even started on the infamous crossword yet. If you like the NYT sunday crossword, you’ll like Wordplay, a movie that focuses on the man most associated with crossword puzzles, New York Times puzzle editor and NPR puzzle-master Will Shortz.

Proud to be…

9 Aug

Chinese…

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Radioactive granite risks

30 Jul

What?s Lurking in Your Countertop?

SHORTLY before Lynn Sugarman of Teaneck, N.J., bought her summer home in Lake George, N.Y., two years ago, a routine inspection revealed it had elevated levels of radon, a radioactive gas that can cause lung cancer. So she called a radon measurement and mitigation technician to find the source.

“He went from room to room,” said Dr. Sugarman, a pediatrician. But he stopped in his tracks in the kitchen, which had richly grained cream, brown and burgundy granite countertops. His Geiger counter indicated that the granite was emitting radiation at levels 10 times higher than those he had measured elsewhere in the house.

“My first thought was, my pregnant daughter was coming for the weekend,” Dr. Sugarman said. When the technician told her to keep her daughter several feet from the countertops just to be safe, she said, “I had them ripped out that very day,” and sent to the state Department of Health for analysis. The granite, it turned out, contained high levels of uranium, which is not only radioactive but releases radon gas as it decays. “The health risk to me and my family was probably small,” Dr. Sugarman said, “but I felt it was an unnecessary risk.”

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