Archive | moovies RSS feed for this section

Movie: How Are You, Dad? / 爸, 你好嗎?

5 Jul

Sadly, I missed out on the Taiwanese Film Festival this year, and there was one film that I most regret not seeing. As a girl, it’s a given that I have a complex  relationship with my mother – being Asian just makes it so much more twisted. However, as the relationship with your mother which is defined early on in life, the relationship with your father is defined much later on, and is more difficult to put into words.

“How Are You, Dad? / 爸,你好嗎?” by Taiwanese director Tso-Chi Chang reflects and explores all that’s left unsaid in ten gentle, poignant short stories about father and child. Building on the themes of family and identity that have characterized Chang’s works, the anthology assembles a moving and realistic portrait of fatherhood, and the love, memories, and misgivings that come with the package. (via yesasia.com)

Other than the silhouette of his silent back as you walk behind him, what else can you remember about your father?

Fatherly love is perhaps one of the most difficult to express in words—genuine but distant, subtle but deep; beneath that unrelenting tough image of the father often hides an emotion warm and affectionate.

Featuring ten stories of ten fathers from all walks of life,《How Are You, Dad?》shines light on this intimate but much unmentioned love. Whether they are dangerous gangsters, poor villagers that could not afford their children’s medical expenses, or a famous celebrities with soaring careers but a broken family, they all share one common role—they are all fathers, and they all love in different ways.

At the end of the film, you may find your deepest memories resonating and converging into a single simple but genuine calling: “How are you, Dad?”

Length: 120 minutes
Director: Tso-Chi Chang
Cast:  Jack Kao, Fan Chih-Wei, Teresa Ji, Chang Chea

About Director
Tso-Chi Chang graduated with a degree in Theatre Arts  from the Chinese Culture University in Taiwan, specializing in films and drama. His script for the film《Midnight Revenge》, written in1991, won the Government Information Office’s Outstanding Screenplay Award in Taiwan. Since then, Chang’s works have been well received by film critics and shine in both domestic and international film festivals. His style of magical realism helps him to establish a unique position in Taiwan’s film industry.

Awards and Honors
2008 The 13th Pusan International Film Festival - A Window on Asian Cinema
2009 The 11th Taipei Film Festival - Closing Film

Anticipated Movie and Book

9 Jul

The Twilight Saga

Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Series with my fave boy Robert Pattinson aka Cedric Diggory from Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. New book/series to get into: BREAKING DAWN last book of the Twlight series.

Anticipated Movies for 2008

10 Jan

The Dark Knight
Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull
Bond 22
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian
Rambo
Cloverfield
Angels and Demons
Star Trek XI
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
Get Smart
Speed Racer
Wall-E
The Forbidden Kingdom
Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay
The Day the Earth Stood Still
The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor
National Treasure: Book of Secrets
CJ7
Dragonball
Aliens vs. Predator – Requiem
Wolverine
X-Men Origins: Wolverine
Prince Caspian
Religulous
Kung Fu Panda
The Other Boleyn Girl

MOVIE WE HAVE TO SEE

17 Mar

THE HOST! March 30th, 2007. Korean, horror… crazy!!

Cineplex Canada link

Yahoo movies: synopsis and reviews

Movies: Watched and to watch

7 Feb

Curse of the Golden Flower: Starring Chow Yun Fat, Gong Li (love!), and Jay Chou (can’t act).

Overall impression?

1) Holy boobage Batman!  I never knew the Chinese have such ample assets (for being Chinese, of course). Very impressed and proud. Movie also known as: Curse of the Golden Corset.

 

Gong Li is as usual… absolute perfection.

Continue reading

Movie to see: The Namesake

26 Jan

the namesake posterTHE NAMESAKE

Based on the book by Jhumpa Lahiri. One of the most anticipated books of the year, Lahiri’s first novel (after 1999’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Interpreter of Maladies) amounts to less than the sum of its parts. Hopscotching across 25 years, it begins when newlyweds Ashoke and Ashima Ganguli emigrate to Cambridge, Mass., in 1968, where Ashima immediately gives birth to a son, Gogol-a pet name that becomes permanent when his formal name, traditionally bestowed by the maternal grandmother, is posted in a letter from India, but lost in transit. Ashoke becomes a professor of engineering, but Ashima has a harder time assimilating, unwilling to give up her ties to India. A leap ahead to the ’80s finds the teenage Gogol ashamed of his Indian heritage and his unusual name, which he sheds as he moves on to college at Yale and graduate school at Columbia, legally changing it to Nikhil. In one of the most telling chapters, Gogol moves into the home of a family of wealthy Manhattan WASPs and is initiated into a lifestyle idealized in Ralph Lauren ads. Here, Lahiri demonstrates her considerable powers of perception and her ability to convey the discomfort of feeling “other” in a world many would aspire to inhabit. After the death of Gogol’s father interrupts this interlude, Lahiri again jumps ahead a year, quickly moving Gogol into marriage, divorce and a role as a dutiful if a bit guilt-stricken son. This small summary demonstrates what is most flawed about the novel: jarring pacing that leaves too many emotional voids between chapters. Lahiri offers a number of beautiful and moving tableaus, but these fail to coalesce into something more than a modest family saga. By any other writer, this would be hailed as a promising debut, but it fails to clear the exceedingly high bar set by her previous work. (from Publishers Weekly on Amazon.com).

Movie directed by Mira Nair, starring Kal Penn. To be released March 9, 2007.

Amazon.com

The Namesake blog

IMDB

Official Trailer

The trailer moved me… a must for those from immigrant families and had struggles with their cultural identities. Currently reading the book.

“Zoo” a beastiality documentary

22 Jan

Only this can premiere at Sundance.

Exerpt:  “Zoo,” premiering before a rapt audience Saturday night at Sundance, manages to be a poetic film about a forbidden subject, a perfect marriage between a cool and contemplative director (the little-seen “Police Beat”) and potentially incendiary subject matter: sex between men and animals. Not graphic in the least, this strange and strangely beautiful film combines audio interviews (two of the three men involved did not want to appear on camera) with elegiac visual re-creations intended to conjure up the mood and spirit of situations.