Tag Archives: bacon

Superbowl Recipes: Part 2 Homemade Bacon Bourbon Popcorn

4 Feb

Not just for Superbowl, mind you. Movie night, date night, party time, picnic… just watch your waistline!

BACON BOURBON POPCORN

Thanks to Sarah Sprague

  • 5 quarts of plain popped corn (Freshly air-popped or oil-popped corn is recommended.)
  • 1/2 to 1 pound of thick cut bacon, chopped and fried to just about crispy, well-drained
  • 1 cup butter
  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3 ounces of bourbon (Any old bourbon will do here, so don’t feel like you have to break out your best reserve for the dish.)

Preheat your oven to 250º.

Melt 1 cup of butter over medium heat.  Mix in brown sugar, corn syrup and salt and then stir until boiling at the edges. Lower the heat slightly and let boil until the caramel is 250º or until a spoon dipped into the caramel comes out, well, looking like there is caramel on it. Remove from heat and add the baking soda and bourbon. Once fully incorporated, stir in the bacon.

If you don’t eat bacon, mix in 1 cup of chopped pecans. Pecans and bourbon are always awesome together.

Divide the popcorn into either two very lightly greased roasting pans or whatever else it fits into and coat with the caramel. Mix well — don’t worry if the caramel starts to cool on you here, it will warm back up in a second –  and then put the popcorn into your oven for about 45 minutes to an hour, mixing every 10-15 minutes so every last kernel of corn is coated in bourbon bacon bliss.

Once done, pour onto either parchment paper or wax paper to cool and break into pieces.

If whatever reason you don’t eat all of the bacon bourbon popcorn in one sitting (doubtful), refrigerate it for up to a week.  I actually think it tastes better when made the night before and has had a chance rest in the fridge overnight.

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Thanksgiving Recipes: Part 2 – Veggies

10 Oct

Thanksgiving seems to be one of the few occasions where veggies are tolerated or even welcomed as a reprieve from all the meat and starch. Glazed veggie or brussel sprouts are traditional, but it seems like not everyone likes brussel sprouts, probably because they’re boiled or steamed (oh so bland) or overcooked and emit that sulphurous stink.

The key to perfect brussel sprouts is to watch them closely while cooking. To prepare for steaming/boiling, remove outer old and wilted leaves, trim the stem and score an X in the stem.Boil or steam for 4-7 minutes until they turn a vibrant green, then quickly remove from heat and drain. Pick the smaller, tightly packed sprouts, and purchase as close to the use date as possible.

I hope you heart sprouts as much as I do after trying one of my favourite recipes below – Brussel Sprouts, Chestnut and Bacon Sauté. As for something sweet, a take on the traditional honey/brown sugar glazed carrots – Mirin Glazed Carrots

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